I have a MINION!

20 11 2011

So um… work has exploded. (It’s a good thing. It means I should be able to keep myself in decent chocolate all winter.)

Stained glass is a dying art.

I know a reasonable amount about said art.

I have a full roster of shows coming up, and two hands to make stock with, barring injuries necessitating super glue or stitches.

This was the unaltered, unedited beginning to a blog article titled, “Oy, any minions out there?” that I began writing about 6 weeks ago. Given the proclivity of weirdos and opportunists on the internet, I kind of blew off the idea of posting a wanted ad to Craigslist, and somehow even publicly posting it on my blog seemed like opening myself up to a world of potential bad. So I kept thinking about needing a minion, and how best to go about that.

Late last month, I was out visiting a friend at a Renaissance Festival just for fun. She mentioned that she was going to be in the Akron area for a few months this winter, and did we want to get together? I answered in the affirmative, one thing led to another, and before I realized it we had worked out a tentative deal for her to come trade work for some of my product, which she wanted in her booth anyway. It was a win-win situation, at least on paper.

However… given my personality, and how particular (read that as anywhere between anal and b*tch for a boss, depending on the day) I am about my product, I was worried as to the reality of my new minion actually working out. (That, and I really don’t like having people in my studio. It’s an artist thing, and generally an open invitation into my studio for longer than five minutes is tantamount to saying I’d trust you with my dog, my cash box, and the keys to my apartment.)

So my minion and I are now several days into this whole deal, and it’s working out beautifully. She’s knowledgeable enough about how business works to know that when I tell her she needs to be faster at this task or that task that it’s a goal, not an immediate expectation. She’s smart enough to know when a task is defeating her, and to let me know in relatively short order so she’s not wasting my time or expensive supplies making unsaleable stuff.

And I’ve found that I don’t really mind having her there. It makes me accountable for how much I get done on days when she’s not there, and, hey, if you read my blog regularly, it’s no secret that I’m a hermit in a not-so-wholesome way in the wintertime. So my minion coming in two days a week is turning out to be socially beneficial to me too.

That about wraps it up for today, and, well, thanks for reading. Generally I try to walk a line between posting things that are of interest to my audience, and things that I feel like I can write about with either some authority, or at the very least, some humor. But hey, practicality has to take the front seat, either because need dictates it, or because my humorous muse is car sick and puking in a bag in the back seat. (This would be the former not the latter, in case that was unclear.) Mostly I blogged about this today because I feel like I owe the universe (or whomever is looking out for me in that capacity) and my new minion a rather public “thank you”… cause the situation (and my new minion) are really turning out to be the answer(s) to a prayer.

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2 responses

20 11 2011
Karen Grant

Good to know you’ve got a pair of helping hands working with you! 🙂

21 11 2011
Heidi

Congrats for you :- ) I know the feeling about something being a dying art. I feel that way about traditional art. Everything today is digital art (makes me wonder what will happen when the zombie Apocalypse happens). People have argued that it’s just as difficult as traditional art but, I’m sorry, I can’t see it. There is something to be said to be covered in oil or acrylic paint, or dusted head to toe in charcoal. You feel more earthy and in touch with what you’re doing. Sitting at a computer desk, staring a computer screen, that can only bring you so close. Plus, with traditional art, there is no “undo” button. Can you imagine how the Mona Lisa would have turned out if there was an “undo” button?

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